Monday, November 21, 2005

Dealing With Loss through the Holidays

With the holidays approaching and the memories of my departed love ones never far from my thoughts, I reflect back to that first holiday season immediately following the losses of my mother and son, and remember how I dreaded the holidays as they neared.
My mother died in August and my son in September of 1994, so the first holiday without them was Thanksgiving. Prior to 1994, as a family tradition, we spend every Thanksgiving holiday, matter of fact now that I think about it, every holiday at my mother’s house. Because of that, I had no idea of what we would do now that she was gone.
As the holiday drew nearer I began to experience feelings of panic, of insecurity and fear, feelings that seemed to intensity daily. I began to wonder if I would be able to endure the pain of facing the holidays without my love ones as I was certain the pain I felt from those losses would surely increase because my love one(s) were not here to share the holiday with.
The feelings of fear, pain and insecurity began to interfere with my daily thinking process and before long I was not able to focus on one thing for any length of time. This meant that some things either went undone, they weren’t done correctly, or if they were, it took longer for me to complete them.
When Thanksgiving Day finally arrived, I opened my eyes and realized that all of the fears and insecurities that I’d experienced had already reached their peak. I discovered that I was no more fearful or felt any more pain than I’d felt the days, weeks and months preceding the holiday. I realized that all of these feelings were because of my anticipation of facing the holidays without my love ones.
I realized that everyday, whether it was a holiday or not, the pain was no more or no less than what it had already been since losing my loved one(s) holiday. I also realized I’d been living every day without my love ones since their deaths and since I had already survived those days, weeks and months, I knew I would survive Thanksgiving too.
With that realization, the feelings of fear and insecurity didn’t overcome me as the Christmas holiday neared and so too I survived Christmas as well. I’m certainly not saying that I wasn’t sad or I didn’t miss my love ones. I assure you I did. But the anticipation of the holiday didn’t add to the pain of my losses. The pain’s was already there and to some degree, I believe it will always be there.
After surviving my first holiday season without my love ones, I haven’t experienced the type of fear or anxiety over an approaching holiday, birthday, or other special day that I shared with my love ones. I have accepted the fact that my loved ones aren’t with us physically. But it doesn’t mean they can’t be with us spiritually.
I’ve learned that once I accepted that fact I can now face anything that life throws my way. But I did not get to this process of acceptance overnight. It took months of attending Grief counseling in a group setting where I learned the process of grief, and prayer.
I’ve learned to rely on my faith in God. I realize that with God’s help, I could make it through anything, to include the loss of my parents, a child and other special people that impacted my life.
Through my faith in God and my quest for understanding His word, I feel that God was not responsible for the death of my love ones as God is the giver of life. In John 10:10, He states, “The thief cometh not, but for to steal, and to kill, and to destroy: I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly,”so He is the one who could help me to get through the loss of my loved ones.
I credit my faith in God for being where I am today in the grief process. I truly believe I wouldn’t have been able to accept (the final stage in the grief process) the loss of my loved ones.
When I am weak and feel that the pain is too much to bear when I think of my loved ones not being here, I turn to God and ask Him for strength and courage to make it through any moment of weakness or sadness.
It is only with the passage of time that will lessen the pain associated with the loss of a love one. There’s so much truth to the saying, “Time heals all wounds.”
If you have suffered the loss of a loved one and a holiday or other special day is approaching and you feel you cannot cope, I urge you to seek some type of grief counseling. Talking with others who have gone through or are going through what you going through can help you make it through the this most difficult time.
Eventually you will be able to face any day, even the holidays knowing that your loved ones are not very far from you. Once you do, you will be able to accept what has happened. You’ll eventually realize that as long as you live with the love of your loved one(s) in your heart, they will always be with you and will live through you.

Love & Peace,
Vanessa A. Johnson, Author
When Death Comes a Knockin', A Self-Help, Inspirational Book About Loss and Grief Available: Author's Website:


Diamond said...

Vee Jay, Dearest:

I could not lay me down to sleep without posting a comment after reading that heartfelt writing. I do thank you. Loss is loss and grief is grief near the holidays, before or after. It is just the way it is intensified to make one feel around this time. Your mother would be glad for you to continue on in a fine manner taking care of the physical family you have here on earth. I am so glad that you have come to the realization that your family will always be near to you spiritually, near and close to your heart. Your book is a living testimony that healing properties were necessary, that book had to be written, show me someone who would tell you otherwise? Let the record show...Anyway, your family loves you very much, both physical and spiritual. Thank you for that marvelous writing piece.

georgia peach

mochasistah said...

This is all very true. And it reminds me that those who haven't lost family physically but emotionally may have experienced the same thing. For example, I haven't seen my father in years and his birthday is on Christmas Day so for me sometimes, I get a little melancholy. But it doesn't get me to the point of total depression. I guess we have to know that we all have had our time with the ones, God has blessed us with and in good time, whether they are in our lives, or gone because of other reasons, we must be grateful for the times spent, and the special times shared.

Vanessa A. Johnson said...

Thanks Sharon and Mocha for visiting my space. I'm glad the piece brought some comfort and clarity to you. Happy Thanksgiving

Love & Peace,

MsJayy said...

What a powerful testimony VeeJay! I lost my grandmother when I was in the 7th grade, on Christmas Day. It didn't really hit me until years later. I found myself crying early Christmas morning & couldn't figure out why. I journaled for a while & there it was - pain, bubbling to the surface. But I had such great memories of both my grandparents, I moved into a happy space. I often wish they'd lived longer but I know that God knows best. I'm blessed to have such warm memories of them & being loved. That's what we have to learn to hold onto - it doesn't make the pain disappear but it does make it more bearable. Thanks for sharing this. Be empowered Sis!